Archive of Classic

11Dec2018

Book #49: The Trumpet of the Swan

Are you one of those people who hate talking animal stories?  Or super smart animals?  Well, you still might like The Trumpet of the Swan by E. B. White.  Everyone knows about Charlotte’s Web by the same author, but I wonder how many people know about this beautiful little book.  These two are my favorites by E. B. White, with Stuart Little a very distant third. There’s so much to love

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11Dec2018

Book #48: The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The sum total of what I knew about Two Gentlemen of Verona was that it is Shakespeare’s shortest comedy.  I listened to an interesting audio about it, though it wasn’t a summary, so I went into it with fresh eyes. Wow, it was so misogynistic.  Shakespeare usually writes pretty strong female characters, but this play was the worst in that department.  Also, I know that during this time ma

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Book #45: The Beyonders, A World Without Heroes

For the second half of the books in this reading challenge, there will be quite a few that I read for the book group of homeschooled teens that I am mentoring this year.  The Beyonders: A World Without Heroes by Brandon Mull is one of them.  When I met Brandon Mull at Life, the Universe and Everything Conference in February, I told him that I was going to have my book group read that series.  I

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11Dec2018
Author
Jenny
Category
Classic, Fiction, Read Aloud

Book #42: Pride and Prejudice

It was an ambitious project, but I decided to read Pride and Prejudice aloud to my kids.  It seems ridiculous to give a summary of the book, so I won’t.  Instead, I’ll tell you a story about why I decided to read it out loud instead of just read it to myself, which was my original plan. Oliver DeMille, an education expert, tells a story of when he was teaching college.  The class was abo

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27Nov2018

Book #37: That Which Is Seen and That Which Is Not Seen

I took a class over the summer that had some reading assignments and one of them was an article by Frédéric Bastiat, a French economist and writer.  He believed in a free economy and invented the concept of opportunity cost, though it wasn’t coined that for another century.  He’s a pretty interesting person and the article I read by him (which I’m totally counting as a book since it was

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06Oct2018

Book #36: The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

I’ve already written my strong feelings on this book here, so I won’t go into it much more here, but it’s a good reminder that some books are worth returning to again and again. After a particularly bonding experience at a book club I hosted one night, as a group we decided to study The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey together.  Over seven weeks, we read and disc

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06Oct2018

Book #31: Mere Christianity

Next on my scripture supplement reading was Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis.  This book has been on my to-read list for ages and after I found it in a stack of books given to me by a friend, I thought it was about time I read it. I went into reading it blind, not really knowing what it was about other than, uh, Christianity.  It’s actually a compilation of talks Lewis did for radio, which w

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08Aug2018

Book #26: Sabriel

Oh goody.  This is one of my favorite books, and the first in one of my favorite series of all time.  I suggested it for my book club and it didn’t even bother me that it wasn’t universally loved.  I don’t care.  It’s still awesome. Garth Nix is an amazing writer and Sabriel isn’t even the best book in his Old Kingdom series.  It’s a good hook to keep going, but I love the othe

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08Aug2018

Book #25: Carry On, Mr. Bowditch

Carry On, Mr. Bowditch by Jean Lee Latham is very familiar to me as this was my third time reading it.  I needed to read it for an online class I was taking and decided for this time around, I’d read it aloud to my 11- and 8-year-old kids.  I wondered what they would think, considering the advanced vocabulary about navigation, math and sailing, but they didn’t mind.  They loved it.  That

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26Jul2018

Book #15: Stories of Beowulf

I know, you’re probably thinking, “She read Beowulf?  WHY??”  Aside from excerpts in college, I’ve never read Beowulf.  I always thought it was interesting, but never read the whole thing.  On impulse, I got a copy of Stories of Beowulf Told to the Children by H. E. Marshall, curious to see what my kids would think of it. Marshall simplifies and cuts through the old English, but sin

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