Archive of Homeschool

15Dec2018

Books #68 & #69: Way to Be! and True to the Faith

Most mornings, my kids and I meet together to have a short devotional before we start our school day.  It usually involves something related to our faith, followed by a prayer.  I’ve done a million different variations on this.  Most of the year was spent reading definitions from True to the Faith, a book published by our church that acts like a glossary of terms.  It’s designed to be a co

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Book #66: The Beyonders: Chasing the Prophecy

Is it bad manners to say ditto again?  The third book in the Beyonders series might be my favorite, but that might be because I’m so emotionally invested in these characters that I feel every step they take with such weight.  Dang, this series is good. Goodreads rating: 5 stars

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14Dec2018

Book #65: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

I’m probably making ridiculous demands on myself, reading-wise.  I’ve challenged myself to read 100 books this year, but I’m in rehab for that.  I’m in a book club with friends in the area.  I’m in a book club with the parents in my homeschool group.  I’m mentoring a book group with the teens in my homeschool group.  I’m subscribed to a monthly book club online where I get ment

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14Dec2018

Book #63: King Henry IV, part 1

I’ve never read a history play before and with the new plan to study both a tragedy and a history in my Shakespeare class, I wasn’t quite sure where to start.  Luckily, my oldest is obsessed with Shakespeare and quite knowledgable, so I just asked her.  Where do I start?  She recommended either Richard II or Henry IV part 1.  Which is funnier, I asked?  Henry.  So that’s what we did.

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Book #45: The Beyonders, A World Without Heroes

For the second half of the books in this reading challenge, there will be quite a few that I read for the book group of homeschooled teens that I am mentoring this year.  The Beyonders: A World Without Heroes by Brandon Mull is one of them.  When I met Brandon Mull at Life, the Universe and Everything Conference in February, I told him that I was going to have my book group read that series.  I

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08Aug2018

Book #25: Carry On, Mr. Bowditch

Carry On, Mr. Bowditch by Jean Lee Latham is very familiar to me as this was my third time reading it.  I needed to read it for an online class I was taking and decided for this time around, I’d read it aloud to my 11- and 8-year-old kids.  I wondered what they would think, considering the advanced vocabulary about navigation, math and sailing, but they didn’t mind.  They loved it.  That

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08Aug2018

Book #24: The Read-Aloud Family: Making Meaningful and Lasting Connections with Your Kids

I love books of lists, particularly books that are about books and include lists.  It’s a very specific obsession and I’m always on the prowl for them.  My favorites are Honey for a Child’s Heart by Gladys Hunt (and her companion books, Honey for a Teen’s Heart and Honey for a Woman’s Heart), The Read-Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease, Give Your Child the World by Jamie C. Martin, and now

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30Jul2018

Book #22: World War II: The Rest of the Story and How It Affects You Today

This book pulls no punches.  Richard Maybury is the author of multiple books that force me to examine what I’ve always understood about history, politics and economics, but this was the first.  World War II: There Rest of the Story and How It Affects You Today is a study of WWII from an economic standpoint and what he draws from his research and those of other historian/economists shocked me.

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26Jul2018

Book #15: Stories of Beowulf

I know, you’re probably thinking, “She read Beowulf?  WHY??”  Aside from excerpts in college, I’ve never read Beowulf.  I always thought it was interesting, but never read the whole thing.  On impulse, I got a copy of Stories of Beowulf Told to the Children by H. E. Marshall, curious to see what my kids would think of it. Marshall simplifies and cuts through the old English, but sin

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